Meteor Vineyard
Jason Alexander
 
July 5, 2010 | Crush, Harvest, In the Vineyard, Wine Business | Jason Alexander

Cool Temps Lead to Concern and Opportunity

Nathan Halverson’s article in the Press Democrat on Tuesday gave voice to a concern and conversation raging around Northern California.  Cool temperatures and late rains into the spring already delayed bud break in many vineyards and the continued moderate mid day highs are doing little to help the vines catch up.  For delicate skinned grapes like Pinot Noir, there is the grave fear of mold if the grape are still hanging when the fall rains begin.  The same is true of Chardonnay where even a few spores of botrytis can multiply beyond control, in some cases inside the cluster where it is not even readily visible.  These are concerns for Cabernet Sauvignon producers as well, though the thick skins make them less susceptible.  The biggest concern is ripeness – bringing the tannins and fruit into balance before the suns arc lies too low on the horizon, or the incessant rains force people to get the fruit off the vines.

I noted a tweet earlier in the week of verasion in merlot at Frediani Vineyard just east of Calisotga, but Cabernet producers up and down the valley are scratching their heads and laying out plans for diligent and aggresive vineyard management.

As luck would have it, I spotted Meteor Vineyard manager Mike Wolf strolling around block 3 this morning – a perfect opportunity to get his thoughts. His decade long history of vineyard management in Napa Valley entails myriad scenarios, and he is  quick to point out that every season has its peculiarities and unique circumstances.

“I have heard several people already compare 2010 to 1998, which was one of the most maligned and misunderstood vintages of the last 20 years.” Indeed, in retrospect, many of the wines from the 1998 vintage are fascinating expressions of Cabernet Sauvignon with vibrant acids and tannins allowing for graceful aging.

Perhaps his most telling comment was one of process.

“We may have to get a little Draconian.”

And here lies the essence. It is vintages like 1998 that separate out the great producers from the middling.  Tough decisions are made and implemented.  Anyone can make a great wine in a vintage like 2007 (I was going to say 97 but then thought of all of the pruny and overripe wines where there really was need of intervention) – who will stand out in a vintage like 2010?

The vineyard team is making its first green harvest pass now, and I expect to see several more as the months wear on…

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