Meteor Vineyard
Barry Schuler
 
November 6, 2011 | Cooking, Events | Barry Schuler

Happy Thanksgiving from Napa Valley



I woke up in a cold sweat the other night. Perhaps remnants of the graphic pictures in Nathan Myrhvold’s epic Modernist Cuisine were etched in my psyche. But my hand was clenched around my 25-year-old boning knife. Bits of flesh were everywhere.

Is it possible in anyway that another Thanksgiving is here already? Time is flying like so many Tweets, and it seems we just can’t deny another holiday season is looming. Perhaps the late harvest has thrown off our sense of timing. Happily the fruit (very small, but beautiful crop) is safely in the tank.

With a wrap on the 2011 growing season we can indeed turn attention to the most wonderful time of the year. Not that we can avoid the rum-pum-pum-pum that advertisers already have drumming in our ears, but the aroma of Turkey, the sounds of family, and the nose of some great wines loom large. What to make this year? Can I top last years’ extravaganza?

We were sad to hear that fellow Vinter and artisanal farmer/rancher Lee Hudson was not breeding his heritage Turkeys this year. They were very special. However it was understandable, since he endured great losses to his flock in the last two seasons. But the local area is rich in sources of free range, organic and humanely raised heritage birds, so two freshly killed await.

Our sourdough “mother” created from the natural yeast bloom on our cabernet is percolating away ready to play its role in the fresh baked goods. Carbs be damned (at least for a few days).



Frankly, the best part of the Thanksgiving feast is the classic “Friday” Sandwich of Turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and mayo all piled on very moist home-baked sourdough white bread. Yum. (Save the whole grain for Monday).

I am contemplating little molecular gastronomy this year, most likely as garnishes and accompaniments.

Last year I played Mr. Wizard and banged out a dessert of spherized mango on a thickened crème anglaise, composed to look like a sunny-side up egg. It looked pretty but I found it to be a bit of a disconnect between the eyes and the taste buds.

Preparing the dish was far more like a chemistry project than cooking. How it can be integrated into a traditional meal is some real food for thought. But it’s new and some fun culinary experiences are being created by the likes of Chef’s Grant Gachatz and Ferran Adrian. Wonder how they are preparing their Turkeys? Myhrvold recommends removing the skin, immersing in liquid nitrogen, then deep frying. Once crisped, it is reapplied to the finished bird with Activa meat glue. (sigh)

On second thought, maybe we will stick to the good old-fashioned basics.

As families gather around the country to take a little break from the white noise of life, we’d like to say thanks to those who are supporters of our wine project. The 2005’s are drinking spectacularly right now and would be a great accompaniment to any part of your Thanksgiving feast.

Peace and best from Barry and the rest of the Meteor Vineyard gang.

Oh PS – here is a  special treat: A spectacular new restaurant will be opening soon in San Francisco called State Bird Provisions. We asked celebrated chef Stuart Brioza, the genius behind the State Bird Provisions if he would share a special recipe. Enjoy!

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