Meteor Vineyard

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Dawnine Dyer
 
April 28, 2010 | Dawnine Dyer

Evolution Versus Trends in Winemaking

In winemaking we measure our experience not in years, but in the number of vintages. Between Bill & I, throwing in the odd harvest in the Southern Hemisphere and Europe, we count over 80 collective harvests.

In that time we have seen a number of advances and developments, from the vineyard to the winery. Parsing apart what makes truly great wine is to ponder the evolution of these changes, what separates true advances in winemaking & grape growing from trend and fad.

Over the years perception has shifted broadly.   Sugar levels at harvest have risen and sunk, only to rise again.   The use of oak barrels has carried cries of superiority from France to Hungary to the United States, with ever increasing prices and ever less expensive alternatives like oak chips finding their way into event he least expensive mass market brands.  Even how we define and describe varietal character has ranged widely during our time; indeed, many would argue that our perception of quality itself has shifted, with particular wine styles scored highly in the wine press (converting to sales) while other styles are largely left out of the media discussion and left lonely on wine store shelves.

In the 70s growers were rewarded, more directly than today, for high sugars… the higher the better.  In the 80s, with the near “death by late harvesting” of Zinfandel (and a growing anti alcohol lobby), we looked to Europe and contemplated the role of wine as food.  Then in the fast paced 90s, high sugar again became a major part of the fine wine equation, and, at least in Cabernet, we developed a pathological fear of any plant based character that was green or tannic.

Throughout this time, a profound amount of research emerged from places like UC Davis and the University of Bordeaux.   We gained a better understanding of even ripeness in the vineyard and the powerful impact of green seed & stem tannins.  Vineyard managers began mapping vineyard sites and matching clones to contour, rootstock to soil type – in addition to developing advanced trellising techniques aimed at tempering the effect of warm climates and maximizing the sun exposure of more marginal regions. Here is Napa, as phylloxera continued its “lousy” march through Napa Valley’s vineyards, many growers took the positive approach and adopted these advances with a fervor.

What starts in the vineyard plays out in our choices of winery equipment.  A melange of new “advanced” and cutting edge equipment entered the winery; from destemmers to presses, from multi sized temperatured controlled stainless steel tanks to the now de-rigour sorting tables enabling the hand sorting  of fruit.

Yet, with all of these advances, it remains an open question whether or not we have done ourselves any favors with the squeaky clean, virus free plant material and sophisticated winery tools. The great debate about ripeness, and the variation of styles from the 40’s until today, has never reconciled into a cohesive definition of perfect wines.  If anything, the “advances” have led to increased debate. Traditionalists, extolling the virtues of the great 28 vintage in Bordeaux, the legendary wines of Inglenook from the 40s and 50s, decry the uniformity of the wines from the great vintages (and here I am thinking about 2000 in Bordeaux and 1997 in Napa Valley).  Modernists assert the preference of market driven wines for accesability, for plush tannins and fruit driven styles.  The modern wine press, whose scores drive the bulk of the high end wine market, side on the latter.

Yet, in the world of fine and rare wine, are we not all trying to achieve a form of perfection?  Whose perfection?

If we prune and farm for even ripeness, identifying the moment of optimal ripeness is a matter of much debate.  For some it comes as the seeds begin to harden and brown, for others it is not until the grapes raisin on the vine. Berkeley chef, Paul Bertolli, devotes a chapter in his book Cooking by Hand on ripeness and his philosophical approach appeals to me … in it he says such things as  “… the state of ripeness may amount to only minutes, hours or days in the garden (it’s a little longer for grapes). Or a few years in a years in a human life, yielding to the winding down of function, decay, and eventual dissolution.”  “…intensity is the hallmark of ripeness, the culmination of growth and experience.  But ripeness is not simply the reward for waiting nor is it necessarily guaranteed.  The precondition of ripeness is maturity, which in turn can only come about through the right kind of development along the way.  Ripeness, then is one of the naturally fortunate outcomes of life.”(p 30)

How do you decide what is right?  If you believe in terroir, than it is situational and there will be a “best practice” for each vineyard.  But there is the collective aspect as well… how else do you explain Amarone or Champagne, where technique has been raised to prominence over fruit.  Do Napa Valley Cabernets now fall into that category where technique (oak levels, jammy, almost sweet fruit) has become an important identifier for wines?

For us at Meteor Vineyard, the final blending of 2008 will unfold this month.  The fruit in barrel is the careful amalgamation of best practices from every era.  On the modern, is the carefully selected clones and rootstocks planted by Mike Wolf.  Purposeful trellising maximizing the long temperate growing season of the Meteor Vineyard hillside, diligent work in the vineyard throughout the cycle farming for uniform ripeness while recognizing the unique nature of each clone, each block, each row – and ultimately each vine.  From there we, as wine makers, are largely shepherds, a practice as old as organized community – flagging harvest at a moment when the natural acids of Coombsville meld with the rich fruit characters of Cabernet Sauvignon and the natural tannin structure of the grape.  No excessive extraction, diligent use of new barrels (around 50%) and 18 to 20 months in barrel to round out the wines.

Perhaps that is the wisdom of 80 harvests and the ease of working with a perfect site.  The great wines have always come from the land, we, as viticulturalists and winemakers are simply here to help them along.

Time Posted: Apr 28, 2010 at 10:26 AM
Jason Alexander
 
April 14, 2010 | Jason Alexander

A Short History of Coombsville

Coombsville’s unique placement offers the elements for perfect cabernet.

The Coombsville region’s eponymous name comes from a Napa founding father, Nathan Coombs, whose historic land holdings in the city’s southeastern neighborhood have led to common usage of his name for the area.  Winegrowers are unified in their recognition of the unique geographical characteristics of this region. The soils are a mélange resulting from various geological events. They include volcanic debris and lava flows from the ancient eruption of Mt. George, distinct from the alluvial soils along the Napa River. Other parent materials are derived from marine sediments and stream deposition of cobbled rock.  Through uplifting, weathering, and faulting a mix of well-drained and mineral rich soil has developed throughout and is characteristic of the district.

Cabernet Sauvignon requires warm soils to properly ripen, and Coombsville’s well drained volcanic soils soak up the summer’s heat. Equally important is the area’s distinct micro-climate, resulting from its topography and proximity to San Pablo Bay. The fog typically burns off here earlier than in Carneros to the south, ensuring ample heat and sunshine, but afternoon winds arrive earlier than in Stags Leap District to the north. The result is that summer days are warm, but the daily maximum temperature is of unusually short duration. This temperate profile provides an extended growing season, allowing the slow and even ripening so crucial to Cabernet Sauvignon grapes.

To date fifteen AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) within the Napa Valley have received official recognition by the U.S. Treasury. This regulatory agency protects a wine production area’s integrity by enforcing varietal and wine growing criteria. It also controls that what’s on the label is what’s in the bottle. Coombsville’s legitimate claim to such status has been held up in a mire of political disputes, but there is renewed vigor among producers of the area banding together to push the proposal forward.
Meteor Vineyard’s location in the Coombsville region combines the area’s coastal influence and warm, well-draining volcanic cobble and soils. Those benefits, and Meteor’s 500-foot elevation help produce densely flavored, luscious fruit that is crafted into a perfect expression of the finest Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon.

Time Posted: Apr 14, 2010 at 10:21 AM
Dawnine Dyer
 
April 5, 2010 | Dawnine Dyer

A Philosophy of the Land

“Vibrant, violet-hued, intense color, blackberry, voluptuous, upfront, ripe fruit aromas & flavors, focused, precise, classic, balance and structure” – just some of the characteristics that we and others report finding in Meteor Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon.

Well-drained soils impart depth and minerality to a wine.  During the critical maturation period warm, even temperatures allow for leisurely ripening that softens tannins and produces lush, bright fruit.  Both of those aspects of a great site are amply evident at Meteor Vineyard.

The vineyard possesses another, celestial quality that is uniquely Meteor, something we recognize every time we ferment grapes.  It shows up in the wine’s dense but clear violet-edged color, and a trademark Meteor aroma of red cherries and blackberries.

The three clones planted on the vineyard make our 100% Meteor Vineyard Cabernet more complex to create, challenging us to find that precise balance between the three vineyard expressions.  There is always a discovery.

Winemaking Philosophy of Meteor Vineyards

We believe that in the perfect viticultural situations – when the right grapes are planted in the right place – that the best wine that can be made is the one that allows the vineyard to speak clearly and forcefully.  The winemaking will therefore be simple and non- interventional, like cooking with the finest fresh ingredients and just allowing the ingredients to shine.



That said, our approach is to employ the best of traditional and modern winemaking techniques in teasing out every last ounce of plush fruit and tannin from the grapes.  The fruit is harvested when it’s perfectly ripe, generally in late October.  Sorting out defective fruit, raisins and sunburned berries is done in the field, and again at the winery toensure that we’re working with beautiful, perfectly clean grapes.  These are lightly crushed and then cold soaked for several days prior to fermentation, allowing the extraction of flavors and colors before the alcohol from fermentation changes the nature of the extraction.  As the fermentation heats up, pump-overs, the mixing of the fermentor that submerges the “cap” for optimal extraction, is increased from two to three and than reduced as the fermentation slows.

Draining and pressing is based on tasting and our palate for the quality and quantity of the tannins. Only the free run juice is used for Meteor Vineyard wines.  The wines go to barrel before malo lactic fermentation, which occurs in the barrel.  We use barrels from several coopers: Alain Fouquet, Tarrensaud and D & J are current favorites.  The first racking is done after the finish of malolactic and subsequent rackings are performed based on the evolution of the wine.  Every stage of growing grapes and making wine contains its own challenges, surprises and rewards. The final blend of Meteor Vineyard wine highlights the strengths of each of the three clones of Cabernet Sauvignon in the vineyard.  When we agree that we’ve hit on an expression of the best representation of the Meteor Vineyard, we know that our job is well done, and that the wine has grown into something that others can also enjoy.

Time Posted: Apr 5, 2010 at 10:15 AM