Meteor Vineyard

Meteor Blog

Dawnine Dyer
 
July 29, 2010 | Dawnine Dyer

Sun Valley Auction Live This Week!

Celestial Napa: Up and Down Napa Valley with Meteor Vineyard

The Sun Valley Wine Auction is one of our favorite events of the year.  A stunningly beautiful setting, exquisite food, stunning wines from around the world and passionate eonophiles.  If you have not already purchased tickets, there are still a few available.  Even if you are unable to attend, keep your eyes on the Meteor Vineyard auction lot “Celestial Napa: Up and Down Napa Valley with Meteor Vineyard.”

After a restful night at the Meteor Vineyard guesthouse, you will start your day with Meteor winemaker/partners Bill and Dawnine Dyer on beautiful Diamond Mountain.  Bill and Dawnine will lead you on a barrel tasting of the yet to be bottled Meteor vintages, and then host you for an exquisite picnic high above the valley on Diamond Mountain.

As you start your journey south down the valley,  Meteor Vineyard General Manager and Sommelier Jason Alexander will lead you on a viticultural tour of some of Napa’s legendary vineyards, exploring the characteristics and unique attributes that define the multiple AVA’s of the Valley,  culminating with a tour of the exquisite Meteor Vineyard and a tasting of Meteor’s inaugural and current releases.

Finally, you will delve into “Culinary Napa”, enjoying a progressive dinner exploring menu highlights at several of Napa’s new and exciting restaurants. Some big time chefs are opening new restaurants downtown as we auction this!

Note: Transportation not included.  Time to be mutually agreed upon. Summer months recommended. Expires July 2011.

This lot is for 2 couples (or four people) and includes;
2 nights accommodation at Meteor Vineyard
6 bottles of wine per couple as described below
Tour, Tasting and Barrel Tasting of Meteor Vineyard
Winemaker Lunch on Diamond Mountain
“Dine around Napa” with Meteor Vineyard Host
A Personalized Napa Valley vineyard tour with Sommelier Jason Alexander

Wines from Meteor Vineyard
2 3 packs of 2005 Meteor Vineyard Estate Cabernet Sauvignon Inaugural release Selection 750 ml (3 pack contains 2 bottles 2005 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and 1 bottle Special Family Reserve)

2 3 packs 2006 Meteor Vineyard Estate Cabernet Sauvignon Selection (3 pack contains 2 bottles Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and 1 bottle Special Family Reserve)

Time Posted: Jul 29, 2010 at 10:54 AM
Jason Alexander
 
July 19, 2010 | Jason Alexander

5 Great Wine Regions You Should Know About

It’s entirely possible to go through life eating nothing but the most familiar foods, reading books by the customary best-selling authors or listening to a stock set of composers – so begins last weeks  The Pour column in  The New York Times. Wine critic Eric Asimov goes on to profile a dozen obscure grapes that are the foundation of some great wines and illustrate the diversity the world of wine has to offer. It’s a great article and I encourage you to check it out.

In a similar vein, while Burgundy, Champagne and Tuscany have the fame; there are many “undiscovered” wine regions that produce some of the world’s most exceptional wines. Here are five phenomenal wine regions you may not know but should – including Meteor’s own Coombsville.

Ribeira Sacra – Some of the steeply pitched vineyards in the region of eastern Galicia have been planted for nearly 2,00 years, and yet it is only in the last five years that their renown has grown beyond the boundaries of Spain.  The wines are based on the Mencia grape and offer a delicate spiciness and minerality that pairs with a broad range of food.  Like the Mosel in Germany of its nearby neighbor Duoro Valley, the sheer grandeur of the area makes a trip a must.

Tokaji – Yes, many wine lovers are familiar with the unctuous botrityzed wines of Tokaji, yet one of the most exciting developments since the fall of communism has been the production of DRY wines from the native grapes of the area.  Specifically keep your eyes open for dry furmint – medium bodied, with tart, slightly under ripe pit fruit character; these are awesome wines for seafood dishes and warm summer afternoons.

Santorini – While many revel in images of Santorini as a sun splashed vacation destination, few are aware that some of the most interesting white wines in Europe are produced on the volcanic rich soils of the island.  The grape Assyrtiko is the primary planting here producing crisp white wines with powerful minerality and purity.

Lipari Islands – Malvasia delle Lipari has been produced on the Lipari Islands off the coast of Sicily at least since 100 B.C. (though there is potentially evidence of the wines on coins dating back to 4th and 5th centuries B.C.).  Though dry wines are produced, the magic here comes from the sweet wines of the Island.  Simultaneously unctuous and fresh, these wines are dripping with aromatics of fresh cut flowers, honey and ripe pit fruit.  Stunning.

Coombsville – While it my seem obvious I’d include Coombsville in this line up, it deserves to be here because the wines and wineries of the area are distinctive and distinctly different from the experience you get in more recognized appellations like Oakville or Rutherford. What makes the wines special? In a word, balance – the wines couple dark fruit and textural richness with vibrant acidities and fine-grained tannins.  The red wines tend to be very dark in color with flavors of blackberries, black plums, mulberries, and dried herbs and black olives.

Time Posted: Jul 19, 2010 at 10:49 AM
Jason Alexander
 
July 9, 2010 | Jason Alexander

Best “Unsung” Winemakers

Our celebrity obsessed culture has fueled many trends in recent years, from reality television shows where people name their abdominals (how did “Snooki” make it into the NYT this past Sunday????) to chefs whose stain free jackets attest to careful preening rather than frenetic cooking.  In the world of fine wine we have seen the incredible growth of winemakers whose names are seemingly more important than the wine they are producing. Some of this is justified, yet the readily recognizable names are only the beginning.  Many of the best wines in the world are produced by winemakers you have never heard of – (even if their name is on the label)…

Here are 4 of my favorites;

  1. Kevin Kelley –  Salinia,  Natural Process Alliance,  Lioco; Working in the wine country, you are often bombarded with the sheer diversity of wine being produced – often in miniscule quantities.  I first met Kevin when he was offering the gargantuan inaugural release of 25 cases of this, 30 cases of that.  The wines were, and are, some of the finest wines I have ever tasted from Sonoma.  His NPA project seeks to take winemaking back to its fundamentals.  He is even “bottling” them in reusable stainless steel canisters.  Very cool.
  2. Luigi Ferrando –  Ferrando’s eponymous winery in Northern Piedmont is one of the great viticultural secrets.  Legally part of Piedmont, the Canvese  region lies at extreme elevation in the alps near the Val d’Aosta.  Planted to Nebbiolo (and the white grape Erbaluce) these are incredible wines of finesse and elegance.  Extreme rarities and singular examples of how a place (terroir) defines a wine.
  3. Jean-Michel Comme –  Chateau Pontet Canet, Pauillac – Bordeaux, perhaps more than any other fine wine region, is most associated with the property name than the name of the person tending to the fermentation and vinification.  Chateau Pontet-Cantet has been written about extensively over the last couple of years; as a pioneer of biodynamics in Bordeaux, as a narrative for regeneration and progress as the Tesseron family has transformed the once underperforming estate into a powerhouse that challenges many of the “super-seconds”.  In the background has been Comme – dedicated and driven, knowing that the position of Pontet-Canet on the Pauillac plain has all the makings of legend.
  4. Dawnine Dyer –  Dyer,  Meteor Vineyard,  Sodaro – Again, this seems obvious given the connection to Meteor Vineyard, and yet I feel strongly that Dawnine is one of the most overlooked winemakers  in the history of Napa Valley.  Since 1974, Dawnine (and her husband Bill) have been integral to the growth of winemaking in the Napa Valley.  And while Dawnine is most known for her history with Domaine Chandon, it is her work with Cabernet Sauvignon that most intrigues me.  These are wines of  balance over intensity, of structure over extraction.  Nowhere is this more true than in her work with Meteor Vineyard.

I posted a first pass of this on facebook and twitter and thought it worth listing a number of others that I left off the “list”; Karen Culler, Celia Welsch, Kathy Corison, Wells Guthrie, Pam Starr, Amy Aiken, Ken Bernards.

Time Posted: Jul 9, 2010 at 10:44 AM
Jason Alexander
 
July 5, 2010 | Jason Alexander

Cool Temps Lead to Concern and Opportunity

Nathan Halverson’s article in the Press Democrat on Tuesday gave voice to a concern and conversation raging around Northern California.  Cool temperatures and late rains into the spring already delayed bud break in many vineyards and the continued moderate mid day highs are doing little to help the vines catch up.  For delicate skinned grapes like Pinot Noir, there is the grave fear of mold if the grape are still hanging when the fall rains begin.  The same is true of Chardonnay where even a few spores of botrytis can multiply beyond control, in some cases inside the cluster where it is not even readily visible.  These are concerns for Cabernet Sauvignon producers as well, though the thick skins make them less susceptible.  The biggest concern is ripeness – bringing the tannins and fruit into balance before the suns arc lies too low on the horizon, or the incessant rains force people to get the fruit off the vines.

I noted a tweet earlier in the week of verasion in merlot at Frediani Vineyard just east of Calisotga, but Cabernet producers up and down the valley are scratching their heads and laying out plans for diligent and aggresive vineyard management.

As luck would have it, I spotted Meteor Vineyard manager Mike Wolf strolling around block 3 this morning – a perfect opportunity to get his thoughts. His decade long history of vineyard management in Napa Valley entails myriad scenarios, and he is  quick to point out that every season has its peculiarities and unique circumstances.

“I have heard several people already compare 2010 to 1998, which was one of the most maligned and misunderstood vintages of the last 20 years.” Indeed, in retrospect, many of the wines from the 1998 vintage are fascinating expressions of Cabernet Sauvignon with vibrant acids and tannins allowing for graceful aging.

Perhaps his most telling comment was one of process.

“We may have to get a little Draconian.”

And here lies the essence. It is vintages like 1998 that separate out the great producers from the middling.  Tough decisions are made and implemented.  Anyone can make a great wine in a vintage like 2007 (I was going to say 97 but then thought of all of the pruny and overripe wines where there really was need of intervention) – who will stand out in a vintage like 2010?

The vineyard team is making its first green harvest pass now, and I expect to see several more as the months wear on…

Time Posted: Jul 5, 2010 at 10:39 AM