Meteor Vineyard

Meteor Blog

Jason Alexander
 
October 21, 2010 | Jason Alexander

Introducing Meteor Vineyard Perseid – Catch a Shooting Star

On a clear night in late August you’re likely to see one of nature’s most exciting astral spectacles: the Perseid’s Meteor Shower.  An average of 10 meteors per minute dart across the horizon creating an amazing lightshow. There is no better time to make a wish. The single wish we have always held at Meteor Vineyard is to produce some of the most singular Cabernet Sauvignon in Napa Valley.

The tremendous success of our first two vintages was a fulfillment of that wish. Yet, despite finding our wines offered in some of the most prestigious restaurants in the country and in the personal wine collections of passionate oenophiles around the world, we were driven by a new wish – to allow more people to taste the wines from our unique corner of Napa Valley.

With our 2006 vintage, we embarked on a “stealth” project to produce a wine that lived up to the quality standards of Meteor Vineyard at a more approachable price point.  With our 2007 vintage release, we are excited to offer you our Meteor Vineyard “Perseid” Cabernet Sauvignon.  How did we do it?

The Magnificent 2007 Vintage

Working with an estate vineyard requires an intimate understanding of the land. With each harvest our knowledge of the Meteor Vineyard has grown. We are more in tune to the vineyard’s potential and closer to the ultimate “blending in the vineyard” than in our earliest years when only half of the wine we made ended up in the bottle.  In this, our third vintage, we believe we have achieved a balance that expresses the full depth and breadth of Meteor Vineyard.

Much has been written about the 2007 vintage in Napa Valley. Many have heralded the 2007 vintage as a triumph of nature and the vintage of the decade. The praise is well warranted with Cabernet Sauvignon from throughout the valley producing wines of power and intensity, with ripe fruit and fine-grained tannins. This was certainly true at Meteor Vineyard. Unlike 2006’s challenging weather and endless sorting, the ideal growing conditions allowed nearly every berry to reach perfection.

In 2007, warm spring temperatures led to early bud break with very little rainfall.  The summer remained mild with few of the heat spikes typically seen and dry conditions leading to small berries of intense fruit.  After a brief interlude of cool the second week of October, Indian summer prevailed, affording us plenty of time to consider the optimal moment for harvest. What crossed the sorting table was as close to perfection as Cabernet Sauvignon gets. Our first glimpse of the wines post fermentation confirmed this. We knew we had something special.

We began tasting through the barrels in early fall. It was immediately clear that the Special Family Reserve would focus exclusively on our heritage planting of clone 7 on Saint George rootstock. Four barrels stood above the rest and were set aside for the Special Family Reserve (we will release this in spring 2011).

Simultaneously the economy was in steady decline and it became clear that recovery would be slow. For us, this was a strategic alignment of the moon and stars.  It validated our instincts.  The timeliness of creating quality wine at an accessible price point became evident and we are now proud to introduce Meteor Vineyard Perseid.

2007 Meteor Vineyard Perseid Cabernet Sauvignon

Perseid: \ˈpər-sē-əd\ 1: The Perseids are our most impressive meteor shower named for the constellation Perseus from which it appears to radiate. 2: Distinctive Cabernet Sauvignon that marries the elements of Meteor Vineyard’s clonally diverse plantings in one singularly expressive wine.

Our 2007 Perseid is deeply colored with a vibrant hue leading towards ruby red violet rim. On the nose, aromas of plum, fresh blackberries and black cherry compote mingle with sandalwood, sweet tobacco and bittersweet chocolate.   The palate is rich and supple with firm assertive tannins and a complex mineral driven finish. The wine was aged in 65% new French oak for 22 months.

Allocation

3-packs Meteor Vineyard Perseid Cabernet Sauvignon  $375 each


Wines may be purchased online by  clicking here, by phone at 707.258.2900 or via email at info@meteorvineyard.com.  We anticipate shipping these wines the second week of November 2010.

If you would like to order more wine please let us know.  If quantities allow we will do our best to fulfill your order!

Happy Stargazing from the Meteor Vineyard Team!

Barry and Tracy Schuler, Dawnine and Bill Dyer, Mike Wolf and Jason Alexander

Time Posted: Oct 21, 2010 at 11:28 AM
Jason Alexander
 
October 4, 2010 | Jason Alexander

2010 Harvest; Patience, Experience and the Importance of Site

Three things come to the forefront in a vintage like 2010 – experience, patience and the incredible importance of that elusive term terroir.

The classic “indian summer” conditions swept in the first weeks of October to provide PERFECT conditions to finish up the growing season.  Mike Wolf crew swept into the vineyard at 230am on October 14 and started to harvest.

The cool temperatures in the early months of the growing season were a major topic of conversation.  You couldn’t walk past winemaker or vineyard manager without stopping for a few minutes of careful consideration about when, exactly, we had seen an early season so cool (1999 seemed to pop up often as a reference).  Bloggers and critics immediately went to work denigrating the vintage as a whole, rarely recognizing that months of potential summer heat lay ahead.

At Meteor Vineyard we had bud break on March 19 and had 50% bloom by June 3.  Not unusual, particularly as we are a slightly more temperate climate than other areas of the valley.  Post bloom the cool conditions continued.  This was really true throughout the state of California – even Los Angeles experienced one of the coolest summers on record!  Verasion began in early August in pockets of the vineyard but progressed slowly, with only 50% complete in the middle of the month.

I started spotting Mike Wolf’s truck in the vineyard several times a day and would catch glimpses of him scratching his head as he strolled the rows.  Elsewhere in the valley, rumors of extreme green harvesting began circulating.  Vineyard managers narrowed their range of options to two; extreme harvesting, often to one cluster per shoot – and pulling the leaves from around the clusters to ensure maximum sun exposure, or diligent and considered green harvesting which recognized that many more degree days lay ahead.

Anyone who has spent any time in nature understands that the logic of the natural world, while identifiable on a molecular level, is unstable and downright confusing on the macro level.  How many times have you scratched your head in wonder while weather.com or your local weather person proclaims a likely rainless day as the showers pour down?  While Mike can’t predict the rain (though he can exhaustively gather and analyze data on pressure systems, moisture levels, etc.) his experience and patience were tantamount to pushing us into September with healthy fruit, perfect clusters and room for introspection.

As should have been predicted, the thermometer crept up into triple digits several times over the week in September and into October.  Those who pulled leaves were left with substantial sunburn (I have heard rumors of upwards of 50% of peoples crop destroyed by sun).  We largely missed all of the damaging effects from these high degree days and the temperate nature of Coombsville and the unique situation of Meteor Vineyard once again proved fortuitous. There will be tremendous variation in the 2010 Cabernet based wines from Napa Valley.  What to look for?  Sites tempered by elevation or breeze, winemakers and vineyard managers with experience, and owners dedicated to producing only the best in every vintage, particularly the challenging ones.

A quick recap of phenology;

March 19 Budbreak

June 3 50% Bloom

August 16 50% Verasion

Anticipated harvest?  Second week of October?

Time Posted: Oct 4, 2010 at 11:23 AM