Meteor Vineyard

Meteor Blog

Jason Alexander
 
November 25, 2009 | Jason Alexander

Wining and Dining in Los Angeles

Ready for lunch at Lucques

An article in the recent New Yorker about Johnathon Gold (”the high-low priest of the L.A. food scene…”) explored Gold’s exhaustive quest to eat through the endless array of restaurants in Los Angeles (he covers over 20k miles per year JUST dining in L.A. and environs).   Many commentators note L.A. as one of the adventurous places to eat in the U.S.

The wine scene has been slower to develop.  While mammoth wine programs like the former Grand Award winning Sona excel(ed) at comprehensive programs delving deep into the classic wine growing regions, others have looked broad and far for the most exciting producers from any number of regions from around the world.

Restaurants like Palate in Glendale fuse a passion for artisanal food with wines ranging from classics like Coche-Dury to biodynamic producers from the Loire Valley and Languedoc Roussillon. Caroline Styn’s Lucques and AOC have long sought out interesting wines from around the world – I remember several years ago enjoying Domaine Vacheron’s delicious Bell-Dame and marveling at the potential for Pinot Noir in the Loire (in ripe vintages).  For Italian wines, everyone flocks to Mozza and Osteria Mozza.

For the most exciting wines from Napa, restaurants like CUT, The Polo Lounge, Spago, Boa and Melisse stand at the forefront – constantly surveying the horizon for wines that transcend the status quo.

And don’t forget that many of the most interesting wine programs in Southern California are the regions innovative retailers.  Savvy consumers are tied into some of the most interesting wine shops in the U.S.; HK at Red Carpet Wines, Gary Fishman at Wally’s, Michael Brick at Hi Times and Alan Chen at Wine Connections.

Time Posted: Nov 25, 2009 at 9:40 AM
Barry Schuler
 
November 18, 2009 | Barry Schuler

Meteor Vineyard 2008 Vintage Sourdough Starter

I have been an avid bread baker since my college days.  For me Autumn launches bread baking season and there will be dough rising every weekend.  Over the years I have obsessed over great sourdough and have gone through various phases of creating and keeping starter.

Last fall I got inspired by Peter Reinhardt’s (arguably the absolute guru of bread authors) latest book “Whole Grain Breads” to get some sourdough starter going again, but this time with a unique twist – innoculating the starter with the natural yeast that grows on our very own Meteor Vineyard Cabernet.

The whitish “blush” that is common to smooth skinned fruit like grapes or plums is actually a natural yeast bloom which can be put to work for a natural sourdough starter.  I was very interested to see what kind of terrior could be infused into a “mother” starter.
I soaked the grapes for two days and used the water as the liquid in the starter.  All starters gain more character with age and after 12 months of feeding the started has really come into it’s own, producing robust rising power (without the addition of granulated yeast) and a mellow tang to the breads produced.

If interested I can “clone” some starter for our Meteor Vineyard friends.  Write me at Barry@meteorvineyard.com.

Time Posted: Nov 18, 2009 at 9:36 AM
Jason Alexander
 
November 9, 2009 | Jason Alexander

Fall in the Vineyard

Fall in the wine country is always serene.  The grapes are in the winery, the leaves are slowly changing color and the sunlight feels more refracted and diffuse. The manic nature of harvest feels long ago, and the vines move incrementally  toward a period of winter slumber.  I was taking a quick respite this afternoon while talking to a buyer in Las Vegas and had to stop and marvel at the pristine natural beauty.

Time Posted: Nov 9, 2009 at 9:34 AM
Jason Alexander
 
November 2, 2009 | Jason Alexander

Postcard Perfect Day for Release Party

Despite early forecasts for rain into the weekend, Sunday arrived with perfect fall conditions.

Thomas MacNaughton, of San Francisco’s Flour and Water, prepared a melange of delicious food including Flour and Water’s  incredible house cured salumi, roasted pumpkin soup with smoked duck and pistachio, roasted beet and persimmon salad with curly cress and roasted squash and pancetta salad with pheasant and wild arugula.

The wood fired pizza oven was burning, and Barry and Tom had a friendly battle over pizza crusts (Barry’s starter is developed with wild yeasts from the vineyard).

The food was delicious, and the wines (of course) were spectacular.  Dawnine pulled barrel samples of the 2007 (yes, it is everything it is touted to be), both of the 2006 wines that were released several weeks ago were flowing, and a few of the final bottles from 2005 were pulled from the cellar to demonstrate the evolution of the vineyard.  We couldn’t have asked for a more perfect day.

Time Posted: Nov 2, 2009 at 9:28 AM