Meteor Vineyard

Meteor Blog

Jason Alexander
 
October 21, 2010 | Jason Alexander

Introducing Meteor Vineyard Perseid – Catch a Shooting Star

On a clear night in late August you’re likely to see one of nature’s most exciting astral spectacles: the Perseid’s Meteor Shower.  An average of 10 meteors per minute dart across the horizon creating an amazing lightshow. There is no better time to make a wish. The single wish we have always held at Meteor Vineyard is to produce some of the most singular Cabernet Sauvignon in Napa Valley.

The tremendous success of our first two vintages was a fulfillment of that wish. Yet, despite finding our wines offered in some of the most prestigious restaurants in the country and in the personal wine collections of passionate oenophiles around the world, we were driven by a new wish – to allow more people to taste the wines from our unique corner of Napa Valley.

With our 2006 vintage, we embarked on a “stealth” project to produce a wine that lived up to the quality standards of Meteor Vineyard at a more approachable price point.  With our 2007 vintage release, we are excited to offer you our Meteor Vineyard “Perseid” Cabernet Sauvignon.  How did we do it?

The Magnificent 2007 Vintage

Working with an estate vineyard requires an intimate understanding of the land. With each harvest our knowledge of the Meteor Vineyard has grown. We are more in tune to the vineyard’s potential and closer to the ultimate “blending in the vineyard” than in our earliest years when only half of the wine we made ended up in the bottle.  In this, our third vintage, we believe we have achieved a balance that expresses the full depth and breadth of Meteor Vineyard.

Much has been written about the 2007 vintage in Napa Valley. Many have heralded the 2007 vintage as a triumph of nature and the vintage of the decade. The praise is well warranted with Cabernet Sauvignon from throughout the valley producing wines of power and intensity, with ripe fruit and fine-grained tannins. This was certainly true at Meteor Vineyard. Unlike 2006’s challenging weather and endless sorting, the ideal growing conditions allowed nearly every berry to reach perfection.

In 2007, warm spring temperatures led to early bud break with very little rainfall.  The summer remained mild with few of the heat spikes typically seen and dry conditions leading to small berries of intense fruit.  After a brief interlude of cool the second week of October, Indian summer prevailed, affording us plenty of time to consider the optimal moment for harvest. What crossed the sorting table was as close to perfection as Cabernet Sauvignon gets. Our first glimpse of the wines post fermentation confirmed this. We knew we had something special.

We began tasting through the barrels in early fall. It was immediately clear that the Special Family Reserve would focus exclusively on our heritage planting of clone 7 on Saint George rootstock. Four barrels stood above the rest and were set aside for the Special Family Reserve (we will release this in spring 2011).

Simultaneously the economy was in steady decline and it became clear that recovery would be slow. For us, this was a strategic alignment of the moon and stars.  It validated our instincts.  The timeliness of creating quality wine at an accessible price point became evident and we are now proud to introduce Meteor Vineyard Perseid.

2007 Meteor Vineyard Perseid Cabernet Sauvignon

Perseid: \ˈpər-sē-əd\ 1: The Perseids are our most impressive meteor shower named for the constellation Perseus from which it appears to radiate. 2: Distinctive Cabernet Sauvignon that marries the elements of Meteor Vineyard’s clonally diverse plantings in one singularly expressive wine.

Our 2007 Perseid is deeply colored with a vibrant hue leading towards ruby red violet rim. On the nose, aromas of plum, fresh blackberries and black cherry compote mingle with sandalwood, sweet tobacco and bittersweet chocolate.   The palate is rich and supple with firm assertive tannins and a complex mineral driven finish. The wine was aged in 65% new French oak for 22 months.

Allocation

3-packs Meteor Vineyard Perseid Cabernet Sauvignon  $375 each


Wines may be purchased online by  clicking here, by phone at 707.258.2900 or via email at info@meteorvineyard.com.  We anticipate shipping these wines the second week of November 2010.

If you would like to order more wine please let us know.  If quantities allow we will do our best to fulfill your order!

Happy Stargazing from the Meteor Vineyard Team!

Barry and Tracy Schuler, Dawnine and Bill Dyer, Mike Wolf and Jason Alexander

Time Posted: Oct 21, 2010 at 11:28 AM
Dawnine Dyer
 
April 5, 2010 | Dawnine Dyer

A Philosophy of the Land

“Vibrant, violet-hued, intense color, blackberry, voluptuous, upfront, ripe fruit aromas & flavors, focused, precise, classic, balance and structure” – just some of the characteristics that we and others report finding in Meteor Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon.

Well-drained soils impart depth and minerality to a wine.  During the critical maturation period warm, even temperatures allow for leisurely ripening that softens tannins and produces lush, bright fruit.  Both of those aspects of a great site are amply evident at Meteor Vineyard.

The vineyard possesses another, celestial quality that is uniquely Meteor, something we recognize every time we ferment grapes.  It shows up in the wine’s dense but clear violet-edged color, and a trademark Meteor aroma of red cherries and blackberries.

The three clones planted on the vineyard make our 100% Meteor Vineyard Cabernet more complex to create, challenging us to find that precise balance between the three vineyard expressions.  There is always a discovery.

Winemaking Philosophy of Meteor Vineyards

We believe that in the perfect viticultural situations – when the right grapes are planted in the right place – that the best wine that can be made is the one that allows the vineyard to speak clearly and forcefully.  The winemaking will therefore be simple and non- interventional, like cooking with the finest fresh ingredients and just allowing the ingredients to shine.



That said, our approach is to employ the best of traditional and modern winemaking techniques in teasing out every last ounce of plush fruit and tannin from the grapes.  The fruit is harvested when it’s perfectly ripe, generally in late October.  Sorting out defective fruit, raisins and sunburned berries is done in the field, and again at the winery toensure that we’re working with beautiful, perfectly clean grapes.  These are lightly crushed and then cold soaked for several days prior to fermentation, allowing the extraction of flavors and colors before the alcohol from fermentation changes the nature of the extraction.  As the fermentation heats up, pump-overs, the mixing of the fermentor that submerges the “cap” for optimal extraction, is increased from two to three and than reduced as the fermentation slows.

Draining and pressing is based on tasting and our palate for the quality and quantity of the tannins. Only the free run juice is used for Meteor Vineyard wines.  The wines go to barrel before malo lactic fermentation, which occurs in the barrel.  We use barrels from several coopers: Alain Fouquet, Tarrensaud and D & J are current favorites.  The first racking is done after the finish of malolactic and subsequent rackings are performed based on the evolution of the wine.  Every stage of growing grapes and making wine contains its own challenges, surprises and rewards. The final blend of Meteor Vineyard wine highlights the strengths of each of the three clones of Cabernet Sauvignon in the vineyard.  When we agree that we’ve hit on an expression of the best representation of the Meteor Vineyard, we know that our job is well done, and that the wine has grown into something that others can also enjoy.

Time Posted: Apr 5, 2010 at 10:15 AM
Jason Alexander
 
February 17, 2010 | Jason Alexander

2008 Meteor Vineyard Blending Trial

Blending from a single vineyard is a very different exercise from blending fruit from throughout a region.

Many fine wine regions are based on blending; Champagne is synonymous with blends (though far more grower champagne bottlings focusing on one estate), Port is often pulled from multiple vineyards from throughout the Duoro, and many wines from California are labeled under larger AVA’s to allow for a particular style to be created.  In many cases this style is intended to provide wine lovers with wines that are similar in style from year to year.  Fruit from cooler areas is added for brightness and acidity, warmer regions for base notes and mid palate breadth.  In Napa Valley, people will also pull in mountain fruit for tannins and structure.

Working solely with an individual site, you are faced an individual interpretation of a vintage.  The models here are many as well, with Burgundy remaining the most recognized with clearly defined vineyards delineated since the middle ages.  Each vineyards’ minute changes in soil type and exposition manifests in subtle, and sometimes profound differences.  (Of course, human influence has a role here as well with a melange of clones and winemaking techniques creating variations within the variations).
The Meteor Vineyard sits atop a knoll at 500 ft elevation.  Soils are a fairly uniform blend of volcanic ash, rounded river stone and sedimentary soils.  There is a slight “rolling” aspect to the contour, but for the most part the knoll faces west and southwest.  The greatest variation lies in the 3 clones planted, each with fairly unique characteristics.  This is where the “blending” comes in.
We describe 2008 as the year of fire and ice, with fires peppering the hillsides in the summer and frost affecting bud break.

Clone 337 is always the most delicate of the clones we pull from the vineyard.  Historically, the wines are dominated by red rather than black fruit with a distinct floral component and sandalwood.  Everyone agreed that the 337 from 2008 was the best “stand alone” 337 that we have harvested to date.  More red hued than in 2007, the wine displayed compelling high tones reminiscent of past vintages, with more weight in the mid palate, and a long, vibrant finish.
What clone 4 holds back aromatically, it compounds and compacts into structure.  A range of black and red fruits, with firm tannins and focus.  Perhaps lacking completeness alone, the wine adds depth and rounds out the 337, and somehow tempers the brooding nature of clone 7.
Clone 7 remains the most precocious of the clones.  Muscular and brooding, filled with black fruit and spice, chocolate and coffee bean. Even at this nascent stage, the tannins are powerful, yet rounded, the finish long and firm.  Once again the stand out.
The thing that compels me about these wines is their unique melding of new and old world styles.  The temperate climate and volcanic soils clearly impart a restraint and elegance, while the California (and Napa Valley) sunshine imparts  a fruit character that is unmistakably California.  2008 is clearly more restrained than the previous vintages, yet unique and substantive – another unique example of the character of Meteor Vineyard.
What will the final blend be?  That remains to be seen.

Time Posted: Feb 17, 2010 at 9:58 AM
Jason Alexander
 
November 2, 2009 | Jason Alexander

Postcard Perfect Day for Release Party

Despite early forecasts for rain into the weekend, Sunday arrived with perfect fall conditions.

Thomas MacNaughton, of San Francisco’s Flour and Water, prepared a melange of delicious food including Flour and Water’s  incredible house cured salumi, roasted pumpkin soup with smoked duck and pistachio, roasted beet and persimmon salad with curly cress and roasted squash and pancetta salad with pheasant and wild arugula.

The wood fired pizza oven was burning, and Barry and Tom had a friendly battle over pizza crusts (Barry’s starter is developed with wild yeasts from the vineyard).

The food was delicious, and the wines (of course) were spectacular.  Dawnine pulled barrel samples of the 2007 (yes, it is everything it is touted to be), both of the 2006 wines that were released several weeks ago were flowing, and a few of the final bottles from 2005 were pulled from the cellar to demonstrate the evolution of the vineyard.  We couldn’t have asked for a more perfect day.

Time Posted: Nov 2, 2009 at 9:28 AM
Jason Alexander
 
October 19, 2009 | Jason Alexander

2006 Vintage Release October 2009

History – A Quick Synopsis

The release of our inaugural vintage in the fall of 2008 marked the culmination of decades of dreams and experience.
For Meteor Vineyard owner Barry Schuler, it marked the culmination of a dream hatched over 35 years ago when Barry, a student with a growing passion for wine, first visited Napa Valley.  After roaming the valley and tasting, he was struck with the burning desire to someday live in Napa, grow grapes and make a wine that could take its place among the worlds greats.
Simultaneously, Bill and Dawnine Dyer were launching their careers in winemaking and the history of Napa Valley was being written daily as it emerged as a truly world class wine growing region.  Their paths would include some of the most successful wineries in the valley and an exhaustive understanding of the microclimates and potential of Cabernet Sauvignon from many areas of Napa Valley.
Three decades later their paths converged on a small knoll in a unique corner of Napa Valley that was immediately recognized as home to some of the most distinct fruit in the region.  Meteor Vineyard was born.

Meteor Vineyard – A Rare Coming of Age

When Barry and his wife Tracy purchased the property that is now Meteor Vineyard in 1998, the comments that it was a “natural” vineyard site resounded.  Noted viticulturist Mike Wolf planted the 22 acre vineyard to 100% Cabernet Sauvignon, recognizing that the quick draining soils of white volcanic ash and river stone and the temperate growing season of the Coombsville area would serve as the perfect foundation for world class Cabernet Sauvignon.
The 2006 harvest was far more challenging than the 2005.  An uneven bloom set during spring led to a veritable autumnal “fruit cocktail” – green berries and raisins interspersed with perfect, concentrated berries. The result? – careful sorting in the field and even more diligence on the sorting table.  Thank goodness we are a boutique operation; hand sorting is intensive and exhausting work!  The grapes that passed the gauntlet were as perfect as Cabernet Sauvignon gets.
The palette of clones in the vineyard offered an array of character when it came time to blend. The dark brooding fruit and chocolate tones from clone 7, the structure and intensity from Clone 4 and the bright effusive fruit of 337 resulted in a wine of precocious aromatics, penetrating depth.  This, coupled with what is quickly becoming our trademark mouthfeel, show the evolution of a vineyard that is truly coming of age.

Time Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 9:18 AM